Summer Reading/Viewing: Erin’s Picks

May 24, 2009 § Leave a comment

 

Erin Russell, Co-Editor

Erin Russell, Co-Editor

 

 

Reading:

 

Nine Stories: J.D. Salinger

Ender’s Game: Orson Scott Card

The Virgin Suicides: Jeffrey Eugenides

Mary Rose: A Play in Three Acts: J.M. Barrie

Blankets: Craig Thompson

The Awakening: Kate Chopin

Howl and Other Poems: Allen Ginsberg

The Sandman: Neil Gaiman

The Neverending Story: Michael Ende

The Prophet: Kahlil Gibran

 

Viewing:

 

I ❤ Huckabees

Badlands

Rich and Strange

May

Harold and Maude

Forbidden Zone

Dexter- Season 2

My Girl

Bottle Rocket

Grey Gardens

Summer Reading: Brit’s Picks

May 22, 2009 § Leave a comment

Brit Naylor, Editorial Advisor

Brit Naylor, Editorial Advisor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading:

Rabbit, Run: John Updike
Ragtime: EL Doctorow
Netherland: Joseph O’Neill
Then We Came to the End: Joshua Ferris
Disgrace: JM Coetzee
The Sirens of Titan: Kurt Vonnegut
White Noise: Don DeLillo
The Corrections: Jonathan Franzen
Lolita: Vladimir Nabokov
Ask the Dust : John Fante

Viewing:

Jesus Camp
The Graduate
Barton Fink
Fargo
Burn After Reading
Children of Men
The Darjeeling Limited
Dr. Strangelove
I Heart Huckabees
3:10 to Yuma

Summer Reading/Viewing: Elena’s Picks

May 20, 2009 § Leave a comment

Reading:

 Death is a Lonely Business: Ray Bradbury
The Fountainhead: Ayn Rand
The Perks of being a Wallflower: Stephen Chbosky
Dawn: Octavia E. Butler
Catcher in the Rye: J.D. Salinger
Jane Eyre: Charlotte Bronte
Blindness: Jose Saramago
Odd Thomas: Dean Koontz
Scar Tissue: Anthony Kiedis with Larry Sloman
Ella Minnow Pea: Mark Dunn

Viewing:

 Arsenic and Old Lace
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
CashBack
What the Bleep do we Know?
Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Being John Malcovich
Benny and Joon
American Beauty
Thank You For Smoking
Good Night and Good Luck

Pictures from Reader’s Theatre and Bits of News

May 11, 2009 § Leave a comment

3512357084_b74607c962

3512359890_8e38ed74cfThank you so much to everyone who attended the Reader’s Theatre on Thursday night. It was a lot of fun, and we can’t wait to do it again in September!

These are some pictures of the event,  taken by Miss Sara Kazzi. If you were taking pictures too, feel free to email them to us so that we can add them here.

We’re currently accepting submissions for our Winter 2009 volume. You can find submission guidelines under the Submissions tab. Please note the recent changes: we no longer accept simultaneous submissions. We will continue reviewing submissions for Winter 2009 until October 15.

3511549789_2e972bbdd7Look forward to our upcoming June Feature, highlighting one author and one artist.

If you would like to read Volume I: Spring 2009, this is the best link to follow or share:

https://moulinreview.wordpress.com/category/volume-i-spring-2009/

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3511549257_92666bf3de

Volume I – Spring 2009

May 7, 2009 § Leave a comment

 

Cover Image: Figure in the Space - Heena Kim

Cover Image: Figure in the Space - Heena Kim

Hulking Leviathan the Sun – Brit Naylor

May 7, 2009 § 2 Comments

 

We allowed ourselves to believe no one cared where we were. We played hockey in the street. We slashed each other’s shins until we were bleeding, but no one would go back home for a band-aid, or to Mike Wheeler’s house, even though it was right there. Not one of us would even rinse his legs with the hose at the side of the house. There would be no profession of pain. When we were done, we spread out across the neighborhood, and one of us would strive to understand the nature of our Diaspora or else become delirious and slow in his wandering, fearful of how we were going to make him out to be dimwitted. We would taunt him. We would seek him out first when it was his turn to hide. It was a jocular love, a brotherly love; he was one of us, did he understand this? When we got tired of it, when even Joey Grabel had been found out on the roof of someone’s garage or, once, in a dumpster, when Mike said for the fifth time, I hate this stupid game, then we quit our stupid game and ran with bloody shins down Switcher toward the park. We played with a wilted football that arced like a comet toward the earth, a comet because more often than not we caught it, knowledgeable as we were of the shift and wobble of the sad flying object, made out above the sun like a silhouetted spacecraft or 
Armageddon right up until we caught it in our arms. Then we ran. We ran until our lungs were burning. And that fire was everywhere. 
        This was the summer, the last summer, before middle school, before girls, before drugs and social politics. The last summer where one of us didn’t want to smoke a cigarette, just to see, the last summer, in fact, before we realized that that hoarseness in our lungs some days was caused by the same force that made our sunsets beautiful, that turned them into orange leviathans crashing and turning the world to shadows. It was the last summer, for that matter, where we didn’t know what beauty was, but only how it felt, the last summer where everything was still like that, right down to our bloody shins. The last summer to be ignorant, to never guess that ignorance was what we would miss. The sun was so hot and we never really noticed it, though it baked the skin off our bodies in flakes, flakes we peeled perpetually, and with great zest, because we loved the way the husks of ourselves felt between our fingers. That summer heat rose up out of everything, hot flat rocks and sticky tar and dead grass, and Ms. Spitzer’s cats slunk about in the shadows of houses, looking tired and somehow ashamed; how could we have been unaffected? 
        We were affected, but we were guided by faith, a faith, the faith, older than Christ and written in our genes, a latent swan song stirred up by the simple act of existence. By the heat without us, within us, for it came, too, from our bones as they struggled, sprouted, and our dicks, they wanted to grow up without us. It seemed unfair. It was a conspiracy.  Our faith, our ineffable and obdurate faith led us on 
with the evening, away from the flagship of the sun which burned always whether or not we cared. 
        Our faith led us toward a holy place, a reprieve from the heat, for the rest of life would hold no such caesura until death. We were to exist in no other form, not yet, not just yet, and so we ran back from 
the park down Switcher, it was a race now, all of us becoming quick shadows of ourselves in the growing night, and we felt that we were part of some group of soldiers like from the videogames that our older 
brothers played, we couldn’t play them, it was the last summer before some of us could. The violence was sleeping in our steps, in our hands, as we fanned out, ducking between houses and through alleys, 
losing sight of one another but knowing we were all there. We passed Joey’s house, and Mike’s house, then Chris’s though they all looked the same. We were feeling our way. Sweat dripped down from our temples and between our shoulder blades, a tickle there. 
        We heard the roar of cars off ahead, that’s how close we were. The lights shimmied up from everything – the cars, the houses, the streetlights, the office buildings – and spread out like a haze, so 
there were no stars overhead, only Venus and the moon. Even in darkness we were half-lit. We could feel the blood moving just beneath our skin, believed we might be able to see it glow, even, were it not
for our modern world. We believed this somewhere deep down, in that place without cognitive thoughts, only secrets. That’s where we were going, after all. 
        We reached the rod iron gate in movements: the first of us scrambled over as the last of us emerged from between the houses, panting. We stripped down to our underwear, became fleshy apparitions in the fluorescent light from the Wal-Mart parking lot that filtered through the trees and got tangled in the pool, bounced against the blue tiles. And then we – 
        We jumped. We weren’t aware of our bodies, or each other, or the moon, or the beads of sweat that ran like strangled rivers. We weren’t aware, even, of the water, as it enveloped us. More, what it did: our condition was changed and, buoyant for a moment, we felt not what we were but what we weren’t, not anymore.
OHIO DRIVE
Geoffrey Spurgin
Inside the Dallas Police Department station, the day crew is hard at work trying to finger the guilty. 
“Hey, Wilson? You ever read the book Brave New World?” asks Peters. 
“Shoot! Been since high school.” 
“Well, what’d your teacher tell you you were suppose to get from it?” 
“You mean like, what’s the author trying to tell us? Well, I suppose it’s a cautionary tale of the potential evils when you mess with the Almighty’s work.” 
“Well, I’ll be. I didn’t get that at all. Sure, I was scared and all at first, but then I got to thinking. That Bernard fellow was a miserable son of a bitch. Everyone else round him was happy, so all he did was try to ruin the party. I kept thinkin’ Shut up man! Not everybody hates the world like you do.” 
“But Peters. Them were BRAINWASHED people. That’s the only reason they were happy.” 
“But still… they were happy.” 
Officer Jenkins jumps in. “Bernard was trying to free those people from their mental slavery. See, they was brainwashed in the beginning.” 
“Yeah, I know. But he was also freeing them from their happiness. Way I see, if you’re happy, you’re happy. No matter how you got there.  That’s the point. Happiness.” 
“But what about freedom?” asks Wilson. 
“Les ask the captain. Captain Cunningham? What’s more important, happiness or freedom?” shouts Jenkins. 

 

 

Power Lines - Geoffrey Spurgin

Power Lines - Geoffrey Spurgin

 

 

We allowed ourselves to believe no one cared where we were. We played hockey in the street. We slashed each other’s shins until we were bleeding, but no one would go back home for a band-aid, or to Mike Wheeler’s house, even though it was right there. Not one of us would even rinse his legs with the hose at the side of the house. There would be no profession of pain. When we were done, we spread out across the neighborhood, and one of us would strive to understand the nature of our Diaspora or else become delirious and slow in his wandering, fearful of how we were going to make him out to be dimwitted. We would taunt him. We would seek him out first when it was his turn to hide. It was a jocular love, a brotherly love; he was one of us, did he understand this? When we got tired of it, when even Joey Grabel had been found out on the roof of someone’s garage or, once, in a dumpster, when Mike said for the fifth time, I hate this stupid game, then we quit our stupid game and ran with bloody shins down Switcher toward the park. We played with a wilted football that arced like a comet toward the earth, a comet because more often than not we caught it, knowledgeable as we were of the shift and wobble of the sad flying object, made out above the sun like a silhouetted spacecraft or Armageddon right up until we caught it in our arms. Then we ran. We ran until our lungs were burning. And that fire was everywhere. 

        This was the summer, the last summer, before middle school, before girls, before drugs and social politics. The last summer where one of us didn’t want to smoke a cigarette, just to see, the last summer, in fact, before we realized that that hoarseness in our lungs some days was caused by the same force that made our sunsets beautiful, that turned them into orange leviathans crashing and turning the world to shadows. It was the last summer, for that matter, where we didn’t know what beauty was, but only how it felt, the last summer where everything was still like that, right down to our bloody shins. The last summer to be ignorant, to never guess that ignorance was what we would miss. The sun was so hot and we never really noticed it, though it baked the skin off our bodies in flakes, flakes we peeled perpetually, and with great zest, because we loved the way the husks of ourselves felt between our fingers. That summer heat rose up out of everything, hot flat rocks and sticky tar and dead grass, and Ms. Spitzer’s cats slunk about in the shadows of houses, looking tired and somehow ashamed; how could we have been unaffected? 

        We were affected, but we were guided by faith, a faith, the faith, older than Christ and written in our genes, a latent swan song stirred up by the simple act of existence. By the heat without us, within us, for it came, too, from our bones as they struggled, sprouted, and our dicks, they wanted to grow up without us. It seemed unfair. It was a conspiracy.  Our faith, our ineffable and obdurate faith led us on with the evening, away from the flagship of the sun which burned always whether or not we cared. 

        Our faith led us toward a holy place, a reprieve from the heat, for the rest of life would hold no such caesura until death. We were to exist in no other form, not yet, not just yet, and so we ran back from the park down Switcher, it was a race now, all of us becoming quick shadows of ourselves in the growing night, and we felt that we were part of some group of soldiers like from the videogames that our older brothers played, we couldn’t play them, it was the last summer before some of us could. The violence was sleeping in our steps, in our hands, as we fanned out, ducking between houses and through alleys, losing sight of one another but knowing we were all there. We passed Joey’s house, and Mike’s house, then Chris’s though they all looked the same. We were feeling our way. Sweat dripped down from our temples and between our shoulder blades, a tickle there. 

        We heard the roar of cars off ahead, that’s how close we were. The lights shimmied up from everything – the cars, the houses, the streetlights, the office buildings – and spread out like a haze, so there were no stars overhead, only Venus and the moon. Even in darkness we were half-lit. We could feel the blood moving just beneath our skin, believed we might be able to see it glow, even, were it not for our modern world. We believed this somewhere deep down, in that place without cognitive thoughts, only secrets. That’s where we were going, after all. 

        We reached the rod iron gate in movements: the first of us scrambled over as the last of us emerged from between the houses, panting. We stripped down to our underwear, became fleshy apparitions in the fluorescent light from the Wal-Mart parking lot that filtered through the trees and got tangled in the pool, bounced against the blue tiles. And then we – 

        We jumped. We weren’t aware of our bodies, or each other, or the moon, or the beads of sweat that ran like strangled rivers. We weren’t aware, even, of the water, as it enveloped us. More, what it did: our condition was changed and, buoyant for a moment, we felt not what we were but what we weren’t, not anymore.

Ellensberg – Geoffrey Spurgin

May 7, 2009 § Leave a comment

ellensburg-page-19

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